ANU students stranded; development misses trees

ANU students stranded; development misses trees

  04 Nov 2018

Student Nathalie Johnstone is worried about how she will get to medical appointments and even do her shopping. She lives on campus and is unable to drive or ride a bike due to a disability, so is completely dependent on public transport.

The first-year policy studies and law student said without the Number 3 bus route, grocery shopping and medical appointments would be very difficult to access.

Julia Kanapathippillai has the full story.

Blocked by bureaucracy

Riverview director David Maxwell, left, and consultant Tony Adam, at Shepherd's Lookout looking over the Murrumbidgee River and the area to the right to be developed for 11,500 homes and a conservation corridor. The pair, photographed in 2017, hold the development plan.

Riverview director David Maxwell, left, and consultant Tony Adam, at Shepherd’s Lookout looking over the Murrumbidgee River and the area to the right to be developed for 11,500 homes and a conservation corridor. The pair, photographed in 2017, hold the development plan.Credit:Sitthixay Ditthavong

The developers of the vast new suburban area near the Murrumbidgee River at Ginninderry have suggested the ACT bureaucracy is stymying the inclusion of mature street trees and trying to limit parks because of the cost of maintaining them.

Riverview also wants to charge homeowners in the new suburbs a $100-a year environmental fee to help manage the highly sensitive area, which adjoins the Ginninderra Falls as well as the river, largely inaccessible at the moment.

Ginninderry is eventually to have 11,500 homes, on an area now largely farmland. The joint venture between the ACT government and the Corkhill Brothers is managed by Riverview, set up for the purpose and headed by David Maxwell for the Corkhill family.

Kirsten Lawson has more here.

Reflecting on the politics of science

Professor Kurt Lambeck at the Australian Academy of Science headquarters in Canberra.

Professor Kurt Lambeck at the Australian Academy of Science headquarters in Canberra.Credit:Steve Evans.

The winner of this year’s Prime Minister’s Prize for Science has some views on prime ministers.

Hawke? “He was interested,” the scientist who has interacted with every prime minister since Malcolm Fraser said. Bob Hawke, Professor Kurt Lambeck said, was particularly interested in the science of nuclear waste and showed that interest to scientists long after he had left office.

But John Howard was the prime minister who showed the most appreciation of science and scientists.

“I had no time for the man’s social and international policies, but on science he was good”, the professor said, speaking at the Australian National University.

Steve Evans spoke with Professor Lambeck and has the full story.

Four months down and one order issued

Planning Minister Mick Gentleman  says the government is making progress on building quality reforms.

Planning Minister Mick Gentleman says the government is making progress on building quality reforms.Credit:Fairfax Media

The ACT government’s much-vaunted building regulatory taskforce has issued just one rectification notice to a Canberra construction firm since it began operating in July.

But the larger audit team has cut down a backlog of construction complaints, and issued more stop work notices in its first four months, at 10, than the zero issued in the first six months of 2018.

It comes amid growing concerns about the quality of construction work completed in the ACT, as the territory undergoes its biggest residential building boom since records began, and as a Legislative Assembly inquiry is underway into building quality.

Daniel Burdon has the full story.

New ACT levy on dumping waste?

A lot of waste on local landfill but would a levy on dumping get it down?

A lot of waste on local landfill but would a levy on dumping get it down?Credit:Fairfax

The ACT government is considering charging a new levy on businesses that dump waste.

Households would be exempt, but waste from businesses such as builders and restaurants would be subject to the new charge.

The idea is to make the dumping of refuse more expensive to try to deter businesses from taking it to landfill sites and to recycle instead.

This is another story from Steve Evans.

Today’s cartoon

The Canberra Times editorial cartoon for Monday, November 5, 2018.

The Canberra Times editorial cartoon for Monday, November 5, 2018.Credit:Pat Campbell

Amy Martin is a producer at The Canberra Times

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